Moving Back in with Parents at 30 | Long Distance USA Movers

Moving Back in with Parents at 30

Once you move out of your childhood house, you rarely plan on going back. So, what happens when life gets in the way, and you find yourself moving back in with your parents at 30?

There will be some hardships and problems to overcome. But returning to a place where you grew up might just do you some good actually. You get to resolve any issues you may have with your mother and father, take care of your health, and come up with the best plan for the future. What’s more, bonding time with your family might give you the much-needed energy to get back on your feet.

It’s Not a Failure

Let’s be honest, returning home after so many years is not something many of us planned on doing. It is just not how we expect the story of our life to develop. But sometimes, things don’t work out the way we would like them to, and we have to deal with this fact.

If you get overwhelmed by the feeling of failure, have in mind that a recent research study showed that 28% of educated young people still live with their mother and father. Sharing a space with somebody can have a financial benefit. If being around your family helps you get on your feet, you should not see it as a bad thing. Maybe you require emotional support that only a loving household can offer? No matter the reason, you should not despair. Coming back home might not be what you’d ideally like to do, but it most certainly is not the worst thing that can happen to you.

Being around your mom and dad again will most likely be challenging. Say goodbye to all of your strange or nasty habits. You have roommates now! But they are not regular roommates you are living with, they are your blood relatives.

The Truth About Going Back Home

There are many reasons why a 30-year-old will move back in with mother and father. Issues like the costs of housing, debt, economic factors are on the top of the list.

Saving up money for buying a house is one of the most common reasons for returning to your childhood house.

The Homes.com website surveyed over 1000 citizens who moved back home. They determined that the most common reason is a divorce or a breakup. The survey shows that 33 percent of 26 to 30-year-olds, 37 percent of 31 to 35-year-olds and 24 percent of 36 to 40-year-olds moved back because they had just ended an emotional relationship. Losing a job is another common reason. The survey states that among people who moved back, 45 percent live in their childhood bedrooms and 22 percent pay rent.

Rules of Living with Mother and Father

Being at your childhood house doesn’t mean you get to have a special treatment. Make sure that you follow some rules that will make you a good and considerate roommate to your family.

Remember, you share a house with other people now, no matter that they are your mom and dad. They still pay for the food you eat. So go shopping and buy a bag of groceries once in a while. 

Don’t make a mess of your room, or if you do, try to clean after yourself. Your mom is not your maid. Do your laundry and offer to do dishes. This will all show how grateful you are for your parents, and it will keep the conflicts away.

Spend some quality time with your mom and dad. Let them know you care about them and that you want to be involved in their lives. Being interested in their life will ease any tension between you.

Reclaim Your Health and Change Your Habits

Coming back home after a few years of being away doesn’t have to be a bad thing. Laying low in a familiar place can do you good. You get to regroup. And depending on the reasons for your relocation, this can be the best time to reclaim your emotional health.

Getting out of the relationship, losing a job, being in debt, all these events can leave you anxious and feeling blue. Take care of yourself. Look for ways to lower your stress levels. Spending time with family is an excellent way to do it. They can be a great support system if you want a safe place to share your worries. 

The world is stressful, and it doesn’t affect only our emotions but our physical health as well. Try to make up for the lack of sleep or bad eating habits. Sleep more, eat more fruit and vegetables, walk around more. It will all help you get on your feet and feel healthier.

When you reclaim your health, it will be easier to decide what to do next. 

Revaluate the Type of Habits You Have

We all have bad habits. It’s the downside of being human. Maybe you smoke or drink, or you are a bit of a slob?

Once you have started cohabitating with your mother and father, work on minimizing those habits. Especially if your family doesn’t know you smoke, or if they are not familiar with your tendency to have a couple of drinks.

Reevaluating your behavior will prompt you to become healthier in the long run. 

Put Your Finances in Order and Work on Your Career

Let’s be honest, living with your mother and father will be cheaper than doing it alone or with a roommate. This time spent in your childhood house might be good for your finances. If you’ve been planning a career change, this would be the perfect opportunity.

If you moved back in the desire to save some money so that you could buy or rent an apartment for yourself, you are on the right track to saving up. If your current job doesn’t seem to pay enough, start looking for a new one. Focusing on your career will not only be good for your finances but for your mental health too.

Consider an Important Pro: You’ll Save Some Money

Living with mom and dad comes with some indisputable advantages:

  • It saves you money
  • You have somebody to share the work around the house with
  • You get to have a cooked meal even when you don’t get to make it
  • If you have kids, your mother and father can help you take care of them
  • Family is one big, supportive community that is always there for you
  • If you are sick, you have somebody to take care of you

The Biggest Con: Moving Back in With Parents at 30 Means No Privacy

Sure, with advantages come a handful of things that can be considered disadvantages:

  • Lack of privacy
  • You might be getting over house parties, but still living with parents restricts you to not having them at all
  • Mother and father can be very vocal about opinions concerning your life, which can cause fights and a fallout
  • Social stigma about returning home can be overwhelming for some people
  • This predicament can put a damp on your love life 

Leave Your Worries on the Sidewalk and Rediscover Yourself

Returning to your childhood house can put many things in your life into a fresh perspective. Some problems don’t seem so big or relevant anymore.

While living with the family, try to think about things that matter, the plans you once had or the new ones that you would like to fulfill. If you don’t already have a job, finding one and focusing on your career will help your and possibly your parents’ financial situation. Use this time to start planning your move and figure out a plan for your relocation expenses.

Wage your options. See what the smart next step is and use this time to learn how to move without any problems. And remember that your parents are there to give you a third-person perspective. If you have any doubts, you can always count on their advice.

Give Your Parents the Credit They Deserve – Leave on Good Terms 

You are again on your two feet. You feel content and ready to move out once again? That is a good thing! But be sure to leave on good terms.

Don’t forget to let your mother and father know how much you appreciate what they have done for you. Resolve any disagreements you had before you start a new adventure.

And when you decide to move, make sure you do it keeping the stress levels on the down-low by getting professional moving services that will help you pack, and finally move out of your parents’ house. 

© Copyright 2020 Long Distance Movers. All Rights Reserved.
Check how much your move would cost.

An obligation free quote

Moving Info





Move both your household and a car, and you’ll get a large discount! You can also choose to move just your car(s).

Contact info